The Top Ten Crowdfunding Sites

 CrowdsUnite

CrowdsUnite, a resource for the crowdfunding industry and the largest review site in the world, has ranked the top top ten crowdfunding sites based on user reviews. By Alex Leibowitz, PR and Marketing at CrowdsUnite. www.crowdsunite.com

 YouCaring

YouCaring, a donation based crowdfunding platform designed to help provide money for those in need of things like tuition, and medical expenses, received the top ranking as the best crowdfunding site. Users thought that the site was easy to use and has great customer support. In addition, our users thought that it was very easy to raise money from strangers. One reviewer wrote that it, “was very user friendly, easy to share with others, and no additional fees.”

 Pubslush

 Pubslush is a reward based crowdfunding platform focused on the publishing industry. Reviewers really liked how user friendly the site was, saying that it was very easy to set up a campaign. Furthermore, they liked that after you raise $500, you are able to keep the money that you raise. The only slight problem some users had was that receiving funding from strangers was difficult.

 Seed&Spark

Seed&Spark is a crowdfunding site for films. Users liked that they had the option to create a campaign as rewards based or donation based, giving them more freedom in raising money. Reviewers also said that they liked the site because it was just for people who wanted to raise money for films. One person wrote, “I love that the focus is entirely on film/video – S&S totally gets what filmmakers need and how to support these types of projects.”

 GiveForward

GiveForward is a donation based crowdfunding platform designed to help people raise money for medical expenses. Users thought it was easy to setup a campaign and raise money. Furthermore, reviewers said that it was very easy to raise money from strangers. One of the few problems reviewers had was that there are some restrictions in accepting money from outside of the US.

 KickStarter

Surprisingly, Kickstarter, the most popular crowdfunding site, is just fifth on this list. Users liked that the rewards based crowdfunding site was very good at driving strangers to contribute to their campaigns. However, they complained that the site was “All or Nothing”, meaning that if you don’t reach your funding goal, you don’t get any of the money that you raised. Finally one reviewer said that, “Its a very grueling process. Just the setup itself took a huge amount of time and effort and Kickstarter required lots of changes before it was able to go live.”

 Rockethub

Rockethub is a rewards based crowdfunding site. Users liked that the site was easy to use with great customer support. However, some reviewers did feel that the site didn’t do a great job at generating funds from strangers. They thought that gaining the right amount of publicity to receive funding was very difficult.

 Pozible

Pozible is a rewards and donation based corwdfunding platform in Australia. Reviewers said the site was easy to use, and the customer support was great, with people responding to your questions quickly. One of the few things some reviewers complained about was that you cannot change your funding goal.

CrowdRise

CrowdRise is a donation based crowdfunding platform for non profit organizations. Reviewers thought that the site was user friendly and that it was very easy to set up a campaign. One reviewer did complain that, “The fees are very high. If you are on a tight budget and only use a free page, there is a big restriction on how you can set up your page.”

 Ulule

Ulule is a rewards based crowdfunding platform in Europe. Reviewers thought that it was easy to create a project, and that their questions were answered quickly. However, some reviewers didn’t like that it was hard to get funding from strangers and that the site had an 8% fee for a completed campaign.

 FundRazr

FundRazr is a donation and rewards based crowdunding site. Reviewers thought that it was very simply to set up a campaign. One reviewer wrote, “Fundrazr was very easy to use – it has a very intuitive interface. ” Reviewers did complain that it was hard to raise money from strangers.

This post was created by a user and has not been vetted or endorsed.

 

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Sample Delivery Requirements

Project ID or  Prod #

WRAP AND DELIVERY BINDER

Electronic Files Backup
Electronic files of following paperwork.

Delivery Schedule
Hard copy and PDF file on disc.

Post Production Crew List – Final
Hard copy and PDF file on disc.

Post Production Schedule – Final
Hard copy and PDF file on disc.

Rating Certificate
Certificate of Rating from the Motion Picture Association of America.

Transfer of Ownership
A letter transferring ownership to Studio or Distributor if applicable.

Check Print Creative Approval Statements
Director’s letter approving Check Print

Answer Print Creative Approval Statements
Director’s letter approving final answer print.

Continuity & Spotting list

 

Clip Cue Sheet & Licenses
Company shall be furnished with a Clip Cue Sheet, indicating exactly where each clip appears in the film.

VFX Shot Chart
Complete shot chart.

DTS License Fee
Producer’s Paid License Agreements with DTS if applicable..

Dolby License Fee
Producer’s License Agreements with Dolby Laboratories.

AHA Disclaimer Award Certificate
If animals involved, certificate from American Humane Society..

Vault Inventory
Storage Inventory of Paperwork.
Storage Inventory of Positive Prints
Storage Inventory of Video
Storage Inventory of Sound
Storage Inventory of Negative

Lab Inventory
Inventory of material at Film Lb.

EDITORIAL WRAP BINDER

Electronic Files Backup
Electronic version of all editorial files

Avid Project Backup
Final Avid Project Files & Media

Editorial Bible
Editorial History

LFOA Chart
Electronic Doc.  By Reel.  One for each version.

Theatrical Scene Continuity
Editorial continuity of final theatrical version.

Additional Versions Scene Continuity
Continuity of various versions.

EDL’s
CMX 3600 FORMAT – All versions

VFX Codebook
Master List of VFX Shots.  All applicable paperwork from Rez Illusions

VFX Paperwork
Master List of VFX Shots.  All applicable paperwork from Rez Illusions

Deleted Scenes Continuity
Continuity of deleted scenes.

Editorial Output Log
TV VERSION CHANGE LIST

Avid TV Change ListOptical  Count sheets

 

MEDIA BACKUP

Avid Media Backup
HD or SD Avid Media

Final Playouts
Full Theatrical version by Reel.

Final Playouts
Full Theatrical version continuous.

TItles & Textless Materials
Main Presentation Cards
Main-on-Ends, End Roller, Title Vendor, Font(s) Used, Duration, Finishing Process, Costing. Approved Draft Number, Approval Date

QT of Main and End Titles
Quicktime of Main Titles and End Credits.

Titles  Materials
FINAL APPROVED Main and End Galleys as a PDF (with Date, ver #)

Titles Materials
FINAL APPROVED Main and End Credits (Word Document)

Title Cue Sheet for ALL text
Title Cue Sheet, Reel #, Scene #, Title Type (Locater Card, Subtitle, Main, Main on End), Scene , Description (or MT, MoE, ET, etc.), Title (Verbatim), Duration (in seconds), Length (in feet), Footage in (from first frame of fade up), Footage out (last frame title is on screen – for dissolved titles, still use Final frame the ‘A’ title is on the screen), TC in / Out (24 & 30)

Title Information Sheet
Electronic Word document detailing Animated Studio Logos..

Main Title Presentation Cards
As fully rendered frame file sequence, including Alpha Channel. Type of file sequence (TARGA, CINEON, TIFF) to be determined with Online facility.

 

HOME VIDEO REQUIREMENTS

Deleted Scenes Continuity
Continuity of deleted scenes.

Deleted Scenes Music Cue Sheet
Music Cue Sheet of deleted scenes.

Deleted Scenes Final Playouts
TEXTED HDCams

Deleted Scenes Final Playouts
TEXTLSS HDCams

Deleted Scenes Final Playouts
TEXTED  DVD’s

Additional Versions Backup
Backup of Avid Projects and media..

Additional Versions final playout
Final Playouts by reels.
Final Playouts – Continuous

 

FILM & LAB

35mm Digital Negative
The 35mm digital “original” negative, recorded from graded 2k Data Files to Eastman Kodak ESTAR Negative Stock.

Answer Print
35mm fully timed color answer print

Interpositive Protection Master
35mm fully timed color interpositive protection master (Estar base).   In lieu of YCM back up.

Interpositive Set #1 (Domestic)
35mm fully timed color interpositive protection print.

Internegative Set 1 (Domestic)
Fully timed one-light 35mm internegative (Estar base) made from the interpositive.

Optical Soundtrack Negative Set 1 (Domestic)
35mm SR/SRD/DTS high magenta Combined Stereo Optical Track Negative, manufactured on Estar base stock from the Dolby MO Disk, shot in theatrical (2,000 foot) reel lengths;

Check Print Set 1 (Domestic)
1 – 35mm composite first check print made from the internegative specified in Paragraph A6(a) above and the optical track specified in Paragraph A6(b) above.

Interpositive Set 2 (International)
1- 35mm fully timed color interpositive protection master (Estar base) made before additional printing.

Internegative Set 2  (International)
1 – fully timed one-light 35mm internegative (Estar base) made from the interpositive.

Optical Soundtrack Negative Set 2 (International)
35mm SR/SRD/DTS high magenta Combined Stereo Optical Track Negative, manufactured on Estar base stock from the Dolby MO Disk, shot in theatrical (2,000 foot) reel lengths;

Check Print Set 2  (International)
35mm composite first check print made from the internegative specified in Paragraph A6(a) above and the optical track specified in Paragraph A6(b) above.

Textless Background Negative
The original digital negative of all title background material including main and end credit sequences, and all titled backgrounds

Textless Backgrounds Answer Print #1
35mm check print, manufactured from the textless background negative

Textless Backgrounds Answer Print #2
35mm check print, manufactured from the textless background negative

Textless Backgrounds Protection IP
35mm interpositive manufactured from the textless background negative

Textless Backgrounds Interpositive  #1
35mm interpositive manufactured from the textless background negative

Textless Backgrounds Interpositive #2 (International)
35mm interpositive manufactured from the textless background negative

DCDM
Digital Cinema Distribution Master

Work Picture
If available, the editor’s color work print picture and matching mag track.

Trims/Outs/Cover Shots
If picture is electronically edited, all beta SP telecine tapes used to load editing systems (e.g. Avid), all reference tapes of each cut version and all floppy and/or zip drive backup files from editing system

Trims/Outs/Cover Shots
All LOGS and EDL on floppy disk

Editor’s Script and Code Book

The editor’s lined script and editor’s code book (or a legible copy).

 

VIDEO MASTERS

High Def Video Master
16 x 9 1.78 Full Height per Universal Specifications.  PLUS TEXTLESS

High Def Video Master
16 x 9 2.35 Letterbox per Universal Specifications.  PLUS TEXTLESS

High Def Video Master
4 x 3 1.33 Pillarabox Pan & Scan per Universal Specs.  PLUS TEXTLESS

NTSC Standard Definition Video Masters
4 x 3 – 1.78 Letterbox

NTSC Standard Definition Video Masters
4 x 3 – 1.33 Pan & Scan

NTSC Standard Definition Video Masters
16 x 9 – 1.85 Letterbox

NTSC Standard Definition Video Masters
16 x 9 – 1.78 Full Height

PAL Standard Definition Video Masters
4 x 3 – 1.78 Letterbox

PAL Standard Definition Video Masters
4 x 3  – 1.33 Pan & Scan

PAL Standard Definition Video Masters
16 x 9 – 1.85 Letterebox

PAL Standard Definition Video Masters
16 x 9 – 1.78 Full Height.

DCI DCP Deliverables
Delivered as per DCI DCP Delivery requirements

Archival Backups
LTO3s – Containing final graded DI backup files.

SOUND DELIVERABLES

DOLBY SR & SRD Printmaster
DTS DISC

6 Track Printmaster (5.1 discreet)
6-track printmaster, ( left / left surround/ center / right surround / right / sub)

2-Track Printmaster (LT/RT)
2-track Dolby (SR) printmaster,  All soundtracks that are Dolby encoded shall include at least 30 seconds of “Dolby set level tone” at the head of each reel, and 30 seconds of “pink noise” at the head of the first reel.  Protools

6 +2  M&E
6-track Music & Effects only master,  ( left/ left surround / center / right surround / right / sub woofer).  Protools

 

4+2 M & E
M & E Master  – left / center / right / surround / 5th track dedicated as a dialogue guide / 6th track with miscellaneous sweeteners for “questionable” elements

Dialogue mix stems
All DIA stems, separated, and recorded in whichever of the six channels of the SRD format they have been split;

Effects stems
All EFX stems, separated, and recorded in whichever of the six channels of the SRD format they have been split.  Protools

 

Music mix stems
All MUS stems, separated, and recorded in whichever of the six channels of the SRD format they have been split.  Protools

Stereo D/M&E
Stereo dialogue, music, and effects master.  (stereo dialogue / stereo music / stereo effects).  Protools

3 Track Monaural D/M&E
Monaural magnetic sound master containing separate mixed dialogue, separate mixed sound effects and separate mixed music tracks. ( mono dialogue / mono music / mono effects).  Protools

Audio Master for Layback
Theatrical Version.

Audio Master for Layback
Extended Version.

QC Reports
Extended Version.

Music Score – Audio CD     2 Copies
All score music.  (Sample rate 44.1kHz) in stereo.  Along with complete track listings.

ADR Cue Sheets
Copy of all cue sheets for ADR. 

TV ADR Cue List
Copy of all cue sheets for ADR. 

Dubbing Cue Sheets
The dubbing cue sheets. 

Sound Paperwork
LFOA Lists

Predubs
All  predub units (dialogue, music sound effects and foley), together with the dubbing cue sheets. 

ADR AUDIO
All   predub units (dialogue, music sound effects and foley), together with the dubbing cue sheets. 

AMBIENCE
All ambient sound. 

FOLEY
All Foley Tracks. 

Sound FX
All Hard Sound Effects Tracks. 

TV LOOP LINE
All ADR lines recorded as TV coverage. 

Dailies Sound Reports
All  Sound Reports on “dailies”.

Sound Paperwork
Production Sound Reports

 

MUSIC DELIVERABLES

Music Materials – Pro Tools Session
2-.aiff format/ @48kHz/24bit) containing all music in the Picture – score, original and licensed songs – without dips or fades.  Along with complete track listings.

Paper copy of Score
One reduced paper copy of composed, orchestrated and copied charts.

Musician Vouchers and Contracts
Fully executed copies of every musicians’ contract and/or voucher..

Music Cue Sheets
One (1) copy of the music cue sheet.  See Template VII)  Be sure to Include Title of Film, Director Name, and names of two (2) Lead Actors.  Use Focus Template.

Recording & Mixdown Sessions Info
A document detailing: Rates, Bid Depth, Dates, Location, Engineer, Other Pertinent Information

Final Mix Information
A document detailing:

Mix Desk Settings, Relevant A/D D/A conversions, Paper copy of Final Music Mix Cue Sheets (Dubbing Logs) that were used at the Final Mix/Dubb

Source Music Licenses
Copies of all applicable synchronization and master use licenses which must convey rights in all media now known or hereafter devised, throughout the Territory during the Term

Source Music Reliance Letters
Copies of reliance letters – signed by the Producer and music rights owners – confirming that licenses have been granted for the performance and synchronization of all pre-existing musical recordings and compositions contained in the Picture. 

Score Music Reliance Letters
Copies of reliance letters – signed by the Producer and music rights owners – confirming that licenses have been granted for the performance and synchronization of all original musical recordings and compositions contained in the Picture, including but not limited to all lyrics and orchestrations.

Session Reports
List of all musicians (score, pre-score, sideline or other) including Social Security Number, salary, AFM status, and all session reports and documentation executed by every musician employed stating that he/she has granted Producer and assignees all rights, in perpetuity, in all media now known or hereafter devised to the product of his/her services

Song Lyrics
Typewritten copies of all song lyrics for closed-captioning

ADVERTISING AND PUBLICITY
Color Stills

Color negative contact sheets from all color negative unit photography, along with corresponding original negatives (ii) Transparencies: all original unit color transparencies

Black and White Stills
Contact sheets from all black & White unit photography, along with corresponding original negatives (ii) Transparencies: all original unit color transparencies

Special Shoot Photography
Delivery of all special shoot photography.  All photos that are approved for use shall be clearly marked

Production Notes
Notes prepared as to the production of the Picture, including items related to: underlying work (original screenplay, book, etc.); places where the Picture was photographed; any interesting anecdotes dealing with the production or background of the Picture.

Synopsis
A brief synopsis (one typewritten page in length) of the story of the Picture and an expanded synopsis (three typewritten pages in length) of the story of the Picture, running at least 500 words.

Transcripts
If available, transcripts, or if none exists, tapes of all interviews done by the unit publicist.

Contacts/Cast and Technical Personnel List
Typewritten list containing of the name(s) and phone number(s) of contacts for the principal cast members and other personnel appearing or rendering services.

 

DOCUMENTATION

Copyright Report and Opinion
Current  (within 60 days of the Delivery Date) copyright report and legal opinion showing that Owner has good clear title to the Picture and all underlying rights.

Title Report and Opinion
Current (within 60 days of the Delivery Date) title clearance report and legal opinion showing that the title of the Picture is available and clear for use without infringing upon any other person or entity’s rights

Copyright Registration
Current copy of the US Copyright registration certificate (Form PA) for both the screenplay and Picture.

UCC-1 Searches
New York (county and state) and California (state) UCC searches showing no claims, conflicts, encumbrances, etc. regarding the rights granted to Focus in the agreement.

Director’s Approval
Director’s approval shall be in issued in writing in the form of “Exhibit C”

E&O Insurance
A full and complete copy of Producer’s Errors and Omissions Liability Insurance policy, along with a copy of the original application submitted to the insurers.

SAG/NON-SAG
If applicable a final SAG Cast list. If not applicable, a list of names of all non-sag players with the number of days worked and amounts paid.

DGA/WGA
Documentation from each applicable guild and union evidencing such guild or union’s approval of the screen credits, including copies of all applicable DGA waivers and the WGA Notice of Tentative Writing Credits, if any portion of the screenplay or underlying material was written under the WGA’s jurisdiction.

IATSE
A completed IATSE Pension Plan Payment Percentage Proration form, attached hereto as Exhibit E, to be completed by the production accountant

Residuals
All information and data necessary to enable Focus to compute and pay all sums due under applicable collective bargaining agreements.  (See Detail)

International Documentation

 

Chain of Title Affidavits:
Original notarized affidavits summarizing the chain of title referenced above attested to and certified by the Producer

Certificates of Origin /Fact
Sheets – Ten (10) completed, signed and notarized originals in accordance with the attached Exhibit F.

Certificates of Authorship – Five (5) originals signed by the credited writer(s) of the Picture completed in accordance with either of attached Exhibits G(a) or G9b).

Credit Documentation

Screen
A complete written statement setting forth all on screen credit obligations; and (ii)
A print out of the complete final main and end title gallies,

Paid Advertising
(i)
A complete written statement setting forth all contractual advertising credit and likeness obligations.  Such statement shall include the full text of all contractual credit obligations.
(ii)
A layout of all advertising credits in the form three (3) “billing blocks” (e.g.: one sheets and full page ads/_ page ads or larger/trailer and ads less than _ page and larger than 4 column inches) is to be delivered.  (See Detail)

Approvals/Restrictions
A summary of all cast and above-the-line still, name, likeness, biography, key art, etc. approvals)

Dubbing/Subtitling
Summary of all dubbing and subtitling restrictions relating to the replacement of any player’s voice, including the dubbing of dialogue in a language other than that in which the Picture was originally recorded.

Travel/Lodging
Summary of lodging, travel and accommodation provisions from talent contracts regarding publicity services.

Premieres/Festivals
A summary of all premiere and/or festival obligations, including any travel, lodging and per diem requirements

Cast/Talent/Personnel Agreements
Signed copies of all agreements or other documents relating to the engagement of personnel in connection with the Picture entered into by Producer

Copyrighted Material /Releases/Location/Non-Disturbance Agreements
Signed copies of all licenses, contracts, location agreements, waivers, consents and releases from the proper parties in interest permitting the use of any product, musical, literary, dramatic, copyrighted.

Contractual Technical Consultation
A contact list of all technical talent entitled contractually or by union affiliation to be provided with notice of any and/or all post-production work.

Statement of Rated Materials
A statement signed by Producer certifying that all the technical materials delivered and to which Focus has been provided access correspond to the version of the Picture which was screened and rated by the MPAA

Final Shooting Script
1 copy of final shooting script.

Producers’ Statement
A statement signed by Producer listing all the known versions of the Picture in existence (e.g., unrated, video, NC-17, television, airline, etc.).

Certified Final Cost Statement
A statement of the final negative cost of the Picture certified by the employee principally responsible for the preparation thereof along with delivery of a comprehensive final cost report.

Statement of Payment
An affidavit in the form of Exhibit I sworn to by an officer of Producer that all costs of production have been paid for and there are no liens, encumbrances or claims as of the date of the affidavit

Exhibit H
An information sheet in the form of Exhibit H containing technical specs in connection with the Picture

Dailies Camera Reports
All  original Camera reports on “dailies”

Chain of Title Agreements
Copy of all instruments or contracts covering the acquisition of literary, dramatic, music and other works and materials of whatever nature which the Picture .

 

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Production Wrap Duties

Following are the loose ends that need to be completed before turning over the show to the Post Production department.  These duties are generally handled by the Production Office Coordinator with a lot of assistance.

 

PRIOR TO COMPLETION OF PHOTOGRAPHY:

  1. Start cutting down on office supply orders, bottled water,  etc. Don’t order anything more than what is absolutely necessary to get you through till the end of the show.
  2. Schedule a day to have a cast and crew photo taken. (Try for a day when the majority of the cast will be there. If that isn’t possible, call and invite those who aren’t scheduled to work that day.) Schedule early enough to distribute the photos before final day of shooting.  This will save the expense of mailing an 8 x 10 print to each member of the cast, crew and staff.  If not ready before completion of photography, prepare address labels so the prints can be mailed.
  3. Start planning a wrap party. Design an invitation or notice and distribute accordingly.
  4. If not already done, decide on and order show gifts. If your budget can afford it, order enough for your favorite vendors, film commission reps and production executives.  Whether the gifts are distributed on the set prior to the last day of shooting, or at the wrap party, tag gifts with the names of cast, crew and staff members and divide them by department. Using cast and crew lists, check off each person’s name as they are given their gift. This way, no one is inadvertently left out.  Don’t forget Post Production Personnel.  Check with the Post Production Supervisor for a head count.
  5. Start assembling final crew, cast and contact lists. The crew lists, in particular, should be available to distribute prior to the last day of shooting.
  6. Make a sweep of the office and collect things such as film commission information packets, headshots submitted by Casting, and any type of demo tape—return anything that can be returned.
  7. Check with department heads to see if there are any rentals that can be returned early.
  8. Return any office equipment no longer being used.
  9. After verifying all originals are on file, collect extra copies of outdated crew lists, cast lists, contact lists, schedules and day-out-of-days, and dump them in the recycle bin.  Shred any paperwork that contains confidential information.
  10. Ask department heads to start assessing their L&D (loss and damages).
  11. Inform vendors of when the last day of filming will be and when returns will be made. Also, start scheduling necessary pick-ups.
  12. If shooting film, Tally your Raw Stock Inventory and check it against camera department totals. Anticipate the amount of short ends you will have for sale.  Call companies that buy raw stock short ends, and find the one that’s currently offering the best price.
  13. Scout around for new productions about to start and talk to their production coordinators.  One or two might be interested in buying your leftover office supplies, and any office items such as lamps, fans, heaters, toaster oven, coffee pots, etc. Prepare an inventory (with prices) and fax it to those interested.  Check with Post Supervisor to see what items they might need to complete the delivery of the show.
  14. Review the List of Deliverables to be sure you have all the required documents to hand over to the Post Production Supervisor.

 

WRAP PERIOD:

LEGAL

  • Verify that all contracts, agreements and releases have been countersigned, returned, copies distributed and filed

LOCATIONS

  • All signed location agreements have been returned, copies distributed and filed
  • All practical locations have been thoroughly wrapped, cleaned, and restored to original (or better than original) condition and owners have signed a Location Release form

ASSETS

  • Collect all asset inventory logs
  • If shot on film, balance raw stock inventory, match totals to assistant cameraman’s records; account for differences, if any
  • Pull items needed for re-shoots, added scenes and/or inserts
  • Prepare a list of items for sale (with prices).
    • This list goes to the producer(s), director and production executives first, as they usually have first dibs on the items being sold.
    • Often, arrangements are also made in advance for cast members to buy articles of their wardrobe or set pieces they have expressed interest in.
    • Remaining items (with price tags) are often displayed in an open area (stage or large office) where staff and crew members can shop.
    •  Make sure to let everyone know in advance when and where these items will be available to look at and buy.
    • Select one person (production coordinator or someone in Accounting) to be responsible for keeping tabs on what is being sold and for collecting the money.

RETURN

  • Equipment
  • Vehicles
  • Walkie-talkies
  • Pagers/cellular phones
  • Props
  • Set dressing
  • Wardrobe
  • Greens
  • Flats/cycs/backdrops

SELL OR STORE

  • Short ends (if applicable)
  • Polariod™ film (if applicable)
  • Props
  • Set dressing
  • Unused expendables
  • Computer software
  • Fans/heaters
  • Coffee pots/toaster oven
  • Tools/lumber/building supplies
  • Wardrobe
  • Office supplies, lamps, answering machine, etc.
  • Arrange storage of assets not sold, if company does not already have storage facilities

PAPERWORK

  • Final Cast List
  • Final Crew and Staff list
  • Final Script with all revised pages
  • Final Shooting Schedule
  • Final Day-Out-of-Days
  • Final Location List
  • Final Contact List
  • Prepare Wrap Books
  • Organize and pack-up production files
    • Collect files from the Art Department, Location Department, Producer’s Assistant, UPM, Production Supervisor and Coordinator and discard duplicates (keeping originals whenever possible).
    • Pack files in portable file boxes; label boxes with the name of the show and number the boxes (Box 1 of ___, Box 2 of ___, etc.).
    • Type-up an inventory of the files contained in each box (indicating the box number at the top of the page); and in addition to a master inventory list, tape a copy of each box’s inventory on the top of that box.

INSURANCE

  • Submit all insurance claims not previously submitted
  • Prepare breakdown of pending and unsettled claims

GUILD RELATED

  • All SAG contracts have been countersigned, returned, distributed and filed
  • Submit all SAG Production Time Reports
  • Submit final Casting Data Reports
  • Submit final SAG Cast List
  • Submit all DGA Weekly Work Sheets
  • File DGA Employment Data Report
  • Final DGA and WGA screen credit approval.

ACCOUNTING RELATED

  • Make sure all final time cards are submitted
  • Collect all refundable deposits
  • Close accounts and ask vendors to submit final invoices
  • Collect all L&D charges
  • Have all outstanding invoices approved and paid
  • Send out forwarding address notices
  • Collect outstanding petty cash
  • Prepare a 1099 list
  • Prepare a final vendor list (in alphabetical order)
  • Prepare a final budget
  • Prepare a final cost report
  • Prepare notes regarding all pending issues for the post production accountant
  • Turn all files over to the Post Production Supervisor or Accountant

CLOSING THE PRODUCTION OFFICE

  • Submit change-of-address to post office  (if necessary)
    Submit forwarding phone number to phone company (if necessary)
  • Return office furniture
  • Return office equipment
  • Disconnect phones and utilities
  • Cancel bottled water/coffee service
  • Return refrigerator
  • Pack up remaining forms and supplies
  • Remove all signs you’ve posted around the outside of the office and parking lot
  • Have office cleaned well and any necessary repairs made to qualify for reimbursement of your security deposit

TURN OVER TO POST PRODUCTION

  • Script Supervisor’s Final Notes
  • Script Supervisor’s Final Lined Script
  • Continuity photos
  • Final Cast List
  • Final Camera and Sound Reports
  • First draft of Screen Credits — Main Titles and End Credits (including all credits based on contractual obligations and union and guild regulations)
  • Copy of all Above the Line Contracts including Cast.
  • Copy of all Below The Line Crew Deal Memos
  • Copy of Complete Insurance Policy as well as any Claims processed
  • Copy of Distribution Deal (if applicable) including the Deliverables List
  • Copy of all Final Schedules
  • Copy of all Call Sheets
  • Copy of all Production Reports
  • Copy of Transfer of Ownership Letter
  • Inventory List of stored Production Assets as well as location and accesses to Storage
  • Set Production Stills and Contact Sheets
  • Publicity Materials including Interview Transcripts if available.
  • Production Notes
  • Copyright Registration
  • Copyright Report and Opinion
  • Chain of Title Agreements
  • Final SAG Cast List or Non SAG players and the time worked and amount paid
  • All information and data necessary to compute and pay all sums due under applicable collective bargaining agreements.
  • Chain of Title Affidavits:Certificate of Ownership
  • Summary of Lodging, Travel and Accommodation provisions from talent contracts regarding publicity services.
  • A summary of all premiere and/or festival obligations, including any travel, lodging and per diem requiremen
  • Signed copies of all agreements or other documents relating to the engagement of personnel in connection with the Picture entered into by Producer
  • Signed copies of all licenses, contracts, location agreements, waivers, consents and releases from the proper parties in interest permitting the use of any product, musical, literary, dramatic, copyrighted.
  • Documentation from each applicable guild and union:
    • Guild or Union’s approval of the screen credits
    • DGA waivers
    • WGA Notice of Tentative Writing Credits, if any portion of the screenplay or underlying material was written under the WGA’s jurisdiction.
    • If union, A completed IATSE Pension Plan Payment Percentage Proration form Exhibit E, to be completed by the production accountant

BEFORE WALKING OUT THE DOOR

  • Send out special thank you notes to those whose contributions meant the most to you during production
  • Prepare a detailed memo for the Production Executive or Post Productin Supervisor summarizing all on-going or pending issues (anything that might come up) and the status of each
  • Send files to the studio/production company
  • Have a final walk-through the office with the property manager before turning over the keys

 

Unpaid Interns

Six Steps to Having an Unpaid Intern
Guest Blog
by Mike Haberman on October 1, 2012

Interns, also known as Co-op students, have long been used by companies as a method of getting some inexpensive labor while providing a student with valuable work experience. In a tight candidate labor market it is an efficient way for a company to “test out” a prospective recruit and to pre-recruit them. In a tight job market, such as we have today, it is often suggested that the way you may be able to get a job is to offer your services to a company as an intern in order to let a company see the quality of your work. Many companies developed extensive college and university internship programs to test out these prospective recruits.  Having worked at a company where we used interns I know the value of the work experience in enhancing a student’s education. However, before you start down the road of using an unpaid intern there are six steps you must follow to obey the rules.

Unpaid Internships Are Problematic

The U.S. Department of Labor has specific rules on using interns, especially if you are not planning on paying them. There are a six specific steps that must be taken to insure that the unpaid internship meets the requirements of the USDOL. These steps, taken from the USDOL Fact Sheet #71 are:

  1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
  2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;
  3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff;
  4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;
  5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
  6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

Pay particular attention to #4 on that list. The employer can derive NO IMMEDIATE advantage from the activities of the intern. That is a pretty tough standard to meet and often is counter to the intent of the employer.

Paid internships

As an employer if you are interested in using an intern for both your benefit and theirs you are better off making the position a paid one. Doing so allows the hiring company more freedom in using the intern to fill in positions where needed. There are many advantages to using interns. The intern gets an opportunity to experience the work and the culture of the company. The company gets an opportunity to experience the work ethic of the intern and to judge the quality of their work and the fit to the company culture. If the company ends up hiring them they then get an employee who more quickly comes up to speed in their new job because they have already had the “newness” rubbed off of them. They are incorporated into the normal work at a faster pace and thus become more productive quickly. Therefore they have a quicker ROI than the typical newly minted student. It also has the advantage of taking them off the market before a competitor can hire them.

However, as with the unpaid intern, there are steps that must be followed to insure you are following the USDOL regulations. You must remember these interns become regular non-exempt employees. All of the FLSA rules on minimum wage, paperwork, recording hours worked, paying overtime, proper deduction of taxes, immigration documentation and more apply. Essentially they are paid part-time employees.

Keep in Mind the Educational Intent of Internship Programs

Even though you are getting an intern as a less expensive employee never lose sight of the educational intent of the position. They are working for the company in order to learn. They want to learn about the company, they want to learn about the profession, they want to learn about the world of work. It will take effort and guidance to make that experience a valuable one for the student and the company. As a company if you are not prepared to provide that learning experience you are just better off hiring a part-time employee who is just interested in the job.

Working Hours of Minors

Working Hours of Minors

AGES SET TIME WORK SCHOOL R&R TOTAL TIME
15 days thru 5 mos 9:30-11:30am
2:30-4:30pm
20 min n/a 1 hr 40min 2 hrs
6 mos thru 1 yr 4 hrs 2 hrs n/a 2 hrs 4 1/2 hrs
2 yrs thru 5 yrs 6 hrs 3 hrs n/a 3 hrs 6 1/2 hrs
6 yrs thru 8 yrs 8 hrs 4 hrs 3 hrs 1 hr 8 1/2 hrs
6 hrs vacation 2 hrs
9 yrs thru 15 yrs 9 hrs 5 hrs 3 hrs 1 hr 9 1/2 hrs
7 hrs vacation 2 hrs
16 yrs thru 17 yrs 10 hrs 6 hrs 3 hrs 1 hr 10 1/2 hrs

Hollywood Pitching Bible

I recently attended a very informative seminar on pitching for films and television.  It was conducted by Douglas J. Eboch and Ken Aguado, the authors of Hollywood Pitching Bible.

Here is a brief overview of their presentation.

PITCHES

Pitches and screenplays are not the same.  They are different art forms.

Identify key elements of script to use in the pitch.  (Elements not plot points)

Organize your thoughts to translate what is in your head.

Spend time to construct the perfect logline.

Loglines should be:

  1. Descriptive,  quick and compelling
  2. Fewer than 25 words.
  3. Less than 30 seconds.

Elements of a pitch:

  1. Hook – what makes your idea compelling.  What makes it cool or unique.
  2. Character – Why are you rooting for this person
    1. Must be likeable or sympathetic
    2. Tell the pitch through the main characters eyes (P.O.V)
      1. What is he doing
      2. What is he learning
      3. What is his emotional journey
  3. Plot – Structure and arcs

Pitch Framework:

  1. Personal Connection – what drew you to the project?  Why you are emotionally connected. Give your personal perspective of the material
  2. Set the  stage
  3. Tone
  4. Rating
  5. Genre
  6. Type of movie.
  7. What is the context?
  8. How will it be marketed?
  9. Title
  10. An important element often forgotten.
  11. Logline
  12. One liner gives idea of where you’re going and allows you to set up your story.
  13. Setting – Set up the world of your story.  If it is an unknown or new world, describe it. (Sci-Fi, Futuristic, Fantasy).
  14. Characters – Lay out main character(s) at the beginning.  Others can be introduced during the pitch.  Refer to other characters by their description (brother, mother sister, etc.) not their name.  It is easier to follow the story.
  15. Story – Some of which was talked about at the beginning.  This is the majority of the pitch.  Pitch Story, not plot.  Don’t go step by step, scene by scene.

Tips:

  1. Put your best stuff in the first two minutes of the pitch to peak their interest.  Most pitches sell during that initial period.  The remainder of the pitch is to be sure you won’t crash on the journey.
  2. Comparison:

    1. Don’t compare to other films if you avoid it.  If you do compare, make sure it is clear as to how it compares.
    2. Comparisons are good for tone, not concept.
    3. Can be damage control for movies that initially seem hard to sell.  Such as a a movie with a child lead.
    4. If you compare, list two or three pictures.  You might compare it to a picture the person hates.
    5. Compare only to recent movies – no older than 2 years.
    6. No more than 3 pictures.
    7. Compare only to hits, not obscure.
    8. Use Act Breaks on pitches longer than five minutes.  It helps the person to follow the timeline.  It also helps to punctuate moments in your story.
    9. The tone of your pitch should be the tone of the screenplay.  (Comedic, tragic, dramatic, etc).

 

FEATURES:

If you are pitching an idea to sell an unwritten screenplay, give away the end, especially if it really unique.    If you pitching a completed screenplay, don’t give it away.   Your pitch is a teaser for the existing screenplay.

High Concept ideas are much easier to executable ideas.

 

TELEVISION

Don’t pitch a pilot.  Pitch the franchise, not plot or pilot.

Visit the resources page in my website to purchase the book.

Hollywood Pitching Bible

Interview Tips

When interviewing for a position on a Motion Picture or Television series, keep these tips in mind.

  1. Research the show, movie or Production Company ahead of time.  If it is a series, study as many episodes as you can so you can speak intelligently about it.
  2. Know all you can about the person or persons you are meeting with.  Do your homework.
  3. Know what they are looking for.  Be sure to point out your qualifications that satisfy their desires.
  4. Show them your passion and desire for the job.  But don’t run off at the mouth.  Energy is good, but nonstop talking isn’t.
  5. While in the waiting area, do not text.  It gives you low confidence posture which will be reflected when you go into the room.
  6. Always keep your head and chest up, and shoulders back.  High power poses will increase testosterone and lower cortisol.
  7. Never cross arms or sit with legs under the chair.  Keep loose arms, face up, non-contracted legs, and your hands visible.
  8. Try not to sit directly opposite the interview as it can somewhat feel confrontational.
  9. Demonstrate your confidence.
  10. Demonstrate your flexibility.
  11. Don’t be negative or critical of them, the show, or anything or anyone else.  You never know if someone in the room is associated with it or them.
  12. Be honest.  Lies will always come back to haunt you.
  13. Be a good listener.
  14. Leave with a networking contact.  Even if you don’t get the job, you now have expanded your network.

How To Tighten Your Script

What’s the first thing any reader does after they pick up a script and read the title page?  They turn to the last page to see the length.  The page count effects their perception of the script before starting to read.  If you are around 100 pages it feels like it will be a nice tight script and a quick read.  If it is 130 pages or more, it will probably be tedious, and contain lot of redundancy.

Of course there are exceptions.  Epic, historical and biographical scripts tend to be a little longer, but that should be obvious from the title page.

So how do you shorten your script?

FORMAT – Seems like a no brainer, but if your script is not formatted correctly, it will affect your length.  Sometimes it can make it longer.   So be sure it is formatted correctly  so you have an accurate knowledge of how long it really is.  Correct formatting is describe in one of my earlier blogs.  Don’t cheat on the formatting by making the margin smaller.   You’re not fooling anyone.

STORY DRIVEN SCENES – Go through your script.  Does every scene drive your story?  If not, why is it in the script?  Of course, if the scene is to show character development, you might need it; unless you can achieve the same thing in a scene that drives the story. LESS IS MORE

Don’t be afraid to cut.  Be objective.  Re-read your script from an objective point of view.  Be the reader, not the writer.  It’s okay to be brutal.

Assuming your story is tight, you need to go over your script and look for words that are not necessary.   Don’t say something in eight words that can be stated in three.   For example:

Jerry grabs the newspaper and immediately notices the Front Page and it catches his attention.

INSERT NEWSPAPER:  Headline “Dead Body Identified”.

This could be much more concise:

Jerry notices the newspaper headline: “Dead Body Identified”.

Both say the same thing but one takes four lines while the other only takes one.  Does you need to say “Jerry picks up the paper”?  Does it matter?  Giving the direction “Insert Newspaper” is not necessary.  How the headline is shown is the director’s choice.  Specific shots should only be included if they are integral to the story.

REDUNDANCY / TOO MUCH DETAIL – Check your script for redundancies.  Don’t say the same thing twice (or more) in the different ways.  Example:

INT.  ITALIAN RESTAURANT – DAY

This is a typical Italian Restaurant with checkered table clothes.

First, you indicated it is an Italian Restaurant in the Scene Heading.  So repeating it is not necessary.  Does it matter to the story that the tables have checkered clothes?  Don’t waste valuable script real estate describing the obvious.

STAGE DIRECTION – Write, don’t direct.  Even if you plan to direct the project, at this point you are the writer.  You need to make the script enjoyable to the reader.  What’s in your head as a director is not always interesting and is often times boring to the reader.  So don’t load your script with stage and camera directions.

Avoid phrases like CAMERA PANS, CAMERA REVEALS, JON’S POV, and INSERT.  Find a way to describe what you want with the specific shot, as in “newspaper” example above.

ACTING DIRECTION – You are the writer, not the actor.  Actors want to be creative also.  If you have given them a strong character, they will know how to deliver a line.  So keep parentheticals to a minimum. Use only if it necessary for story, character development, continuity or the intention is not clear or obvious.

If possible, place that direction in the action preceding or following the line.  Under no circumstances should a parenthetical be longer than one line.  Try to keep it under five words.  If you need a comma in the line for grammatical correctness, it is probably too long.

DIALOGUE

SALUTATIONS: Try to enter a scene late and leave it early.  Coming into a scene in the middle of a conversation will eliminate salutations and speeches that probably have nothing to do with story.  Just make sure that the shortened conversation makes sense.  Of course, if the opening is used to introduce a character, then you want to keep it.  But try and make it interesting.

“Hi, I’m Jerry”.
“Nice to meet you.  I’m Sheila.”
“Mary told me a lot about you”.

That is a typical boring salutation.  It might be necessary to show they are meeting for the first time, but bend the lines to get more mileage out of then.

“Jerry?  Sorry I’m late”.
“It’s okay.  Mary said you’re always late

Bending the greeting makes it more interesting and also tells you a little bit about both characters.

QUESTIONS:  Don’t continually use questions to drive your conversation.

First ask yourself if the question is necessary.  Can you reveal the answer as a statement without the question?

Don’t ask and answer a question in the same speech

Unless it is a character trait, just state the answer in a conversation manner.

Don’t ask a question that doesn’t need an answer.

If it doesn’t need a response, it may not be necessary for the story or the character

REMEMBER LESS IS MORE.

Words To Lose In Your Scripts

Seven Deadly Sins of Writing…
from Your Screenplay Sucks!

Using Find (Ctrl F or Apple F) in your computer, chase down these words in any form you find them. Losing them or changing them will strengthen your work.

“Find” spaceisspace should find only the word you’re looking for, not every “is” in your screenplay.

is
He is grinning… becomes… He grins.

are
The convicts are singing opera… The convicts sing opera.

the
Nacho hightails it out of the town… Nacho hightails it out of town.

that
Ralph can’t tell that she’s French… Ralph can’t tell she’s French.

then
She laughs. She then looks at Alice… She laughs. She looks at Alice.

walk
Tika walks down the hall… Tika prisses down the hall.

sit
Sitting at the poker table, Doc deals the cards… At the poker table, Doc deals…

stand
The surgeon stands at the operating table and works… At the operating table, the surgeon works…

look
Cheryl is looking at Stephanie… Cheryl studies Stephanie.

just
I am just totally exhausted… I am totally exhausted.

of the
Tom sits by the entrance of the mall… Tom sits by the mall entrance…

begin
The tape begins playing… The tape plays.

start
She starts moving toward the den… She moves toward the den.

really
Betty is really pretty… Betty, hot as a two dollar pistol, struts in.

very
The kids sing a very old song… The kids sing a traditional song. (“very” means the following word is weak…)

turn
She turns and looks at him… She looks at him.

the phone
Bonnie hangs up the phone… Bonnie hangs up.

some
He pours some coffee… He pours coffee.

still
Kevin, still in paint covered overalls… Kevin, in paint covered overalls.

the room
He puts on a tie before leaving the room… He puts on a tie before leaving.

his face
Nora has an amused expression on her face… Nora is amused.

seems, appears
Tony seems upset… Tony is upset… So, is Tony upset, or just appear to be?

her way
Carol pushes her way inside… Carol pushes inside. (“his, its way” too!)

both
They both stare slackjawed at the comet… They stare slackjawed at the comet.

ly
(as on the end of an adverb!) search for lyspace Also search for ly. and ly, as lyspace will not find an adverb at the end of a sentence, etc. Grade school writers go wild over adverbs. You’re past that now. Use them, um, sparingly. If at all.

Search for and change these words (about 90% of the time) in whatever you write and the results will be tighter and more clear. Okay, so it’s twenty five deadly sins. So sue me.

If you think these are useful, for free… you should buy the book Your Screenplay Sucks! 100 Ways to Make It Great by  William Akers